Haroun and the Sea of Stories [PDF] by Salman Rushdie – PDF, Kindle & eBook

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Children and The Enchantress of Florence Haroun sets out on an adventure to restore the poisoned source of the sea of stories On the way he encounters many foes all intent on draining the sea of all its storytelling powers ?. there is something about a story written for an adult audience as myth or child s tale that i love it seems to be concise concentrated and make the simplicity of good vs bad and having a moral seem beautiful rather than simplistic maybe that is because dualities were pristine as a child rushdie s earlier works never captured me midnite s children seem windy and ornate with insufficient structure to hold up the explainations haroun is still written with all the mastery that rushdie shows as a writer but this compression as a children s tale turns coal into a diamond also in rushdie s post haroun work he seems to be working with a greater sense of direction and structure a great example of this for me was ground beneath her feet while once again wordy in my opinion ground hung together as great art while not well read enough to consider myself a rushdie scholar i suspect that haroun is the pivotal career changing work of one of our age s most notable writers so beyond being a great book i think that it is an important book importantly though it s fucking fun

review Ú eBook, ePUB or Kindle PDF Ò Salman Rushdie

Haroun and the Sea of Stories

Alternate cover for this ISBN can be found hereDiscover Haroun and the Sea of Stories Salman Rushdie’s classic fantasy novel  Set in an exotic Eastern landscape peopled by magicians and fantastic talking animals Salman Rus. What s the use of stories that aren t even trueThis is a classified as a children s bookperfect to read to an 8 10 year old Yetnow that I ve read it chuckingsmilingmovedand enrichedI can t wait to play now with this novel It s to be read over and over Storytelling with your friends Want to lie back and be read to by a close friend while sitting under a tree Orare you the ham who loves to read to an active listener This book is filled with imagination so why not use a little of our own with it Rushdie wrote this book in dedication to his son Zafar Rushdie went into in hiding when in 1989 The Satanic Verses was released Riots broke out in several countriesand Rushdie was sentenced to death by Ayatollah Khomeini the spiritual leader of theIslamic Republic of Iran He called upon Muslims to carry out his sentence Later hedefended himself against the fatwa a plea for freedom thought and speech and expressing the value of imagination in literature This was the first novel To Zafar that Rushdie wrote after The Satanic Verses This story is about a celebrated storyteller The Shah oh Blah who loses his talent for improvising stories when his wife leaves him His son Haroun is unwillingly pulled into theadventure involving an arduous journey to the sea of stories to vanuish a powerful enemies and reclaim his father s gift of gab Silence is the force of evil in this story the suashing of language fantasy satire even the truth itself There are allegories and light hearted commentary woven into the tapestry There are people we must defend on principles such as freedom of expression The story is full of reflections about the importance and fantasy myth nature and storytelling There s a treat for those who recognize the meaning of Indian words which are also given to most of the characters and who know about the role of gestures Mudra made oftenby green painted performers in Indian Kathakali dancing Enchanting profound delightfully whimsical and highly recommended for all ages

Salman Rushdie Ò 8 review

Hdie's classic children's novel Haroun and the Sea of Stories inhabits the same imaginative space as The Lord of the Rings The Alchemist and The Wizard of Oz In this captivating work of fantasy from the author of Midnight’s. I m surprised that Viking listed this as a children s literature There s nothing risue in it of course and it is structured a little like Alice in Wonderland but I think it will appeal to both children and adults with its playful style and malleable language There are a lot of puns rhymes and plentiful wordplayRushdie is ceaselessly inventive and his stories within stories are both traditionally complex and compulsively readable I uite like the central symbol of the source for all the world s stories It is a thought provoking concept Where do our stories really come from I think humans have a propensity for storytelling that it is a social act Yet it lives deeper in us as well stemming from our beliefs in myths throughout history Our reliance on stories is endless Similarly this book captures the fascination children have with stories and how this curiosity draws them to deeply understand the world Readers will catch many literary references Anyone who likes a fantastical tale will appreciate his dreamlike whimsy What s this novel was in the same vein as Grace Lin s fantasy series They both played with mythic concepts and applied the tropes to a nostalgic setting Apparently Haroun has a seuel I will likely check it out along with Rushdie s other intimidating novelsI always took Rushdie for a serious fellow for some reason I probably shouldn t lump him in with other award winners like Kundera Eco or Pamuk The I learn about him the uniue his work appears But this book proved to me that he has a sense of humor That discovery will likely be reinforced in my later exploration of his oeuvreAn easy start to an author I hope I will grow to love


10 thoughts on “Haroun and the Sea of Stories

  1. says:

    What's the use of stories that aren't even true? I'm not uite sure why I picked this up it's a children's book and

  2. says:

    What's the use of stories that aren't even true?This is a classified as a children's bookperfect to read to an 8 10 year old Yetnow that I've read it chuckingsmilingmovedand enrichedI can't wait 'to play' now with this novel It's to be read over and over Storytelling with your friends Want to lie back and be read to by a close fr

  3. says:

    Hurrah for diverse books before I say another word I loved how this book drew on PakistaniMuslim stories and imagery and I enjoyed the company of its young protagonist I'm sure younger readers will too I was interested to see how Rushdie would adapt his style and it seems he did so by indulging his taste for cliché and word play as much and as fantastically as possible The magic in this fantasy yarn is all ro

  4. says:

    The Satanic Verses bent my brain funny I thought Rushdie had some good prose the ideas were interesting but the surrealism combined with moments of silliness made for an odd mix and in the end I left satisfied but disoriented like I'd eaten an exotic mealHaroun and the Sea of Stories was Rushdie's attempt to write a chil

  5. says:

    I'm surprised that Viking listed this as a children's literature There's nothing risue in it of course and it is structured a little like Alice in Wonderland but I think it will appeal to both children and adults

  6. says:

    Writers are not easy people to live with Dickens Henry Miller Naipaul the list is long But when you read a book like Haroun and the Sea of Stories you find yourself wishing there was a writer in the family Imagine a book written exclusively for you a poem dedicated to you centuries later people wondering 'Who was the Dark Lady of the Sonnets?' 'who was LucyFanny Browne?' so onRushdie had dedicated his 'Midni

  7. says:

    Great kid's story my son loved it I thought that the language was clever and creative and enjoyed the pace The characters were engaging funny and a joy to follow If you have a kid that is between 8 and 10 years old they will love reading this book with you I am sure

  8. says:

    there is something about a story written for an adult audience as myth or child's tale that i love it seems to be concise concentrated and make the simplicity of good vs bad and having a moral seem beautiful rather than simplistic maybe that is because dualities were pristine as a child rushdie's earlier works never captured me; midnite's children seem windy and ornate with insufficient structure to hold up the explainations harou

  9. says:

    Salman Rushdie blew my mind with his magnum opus Midnight’s Children I’ve been an ardent fan of him since I first read it last year Then I read the allegedly blasphemous The Satanic Verses which turned out to be uite a good book thought it was at first a tumultuous experience I waited with bated breath for his memoir Joseph Anton which I unsurprisingly devoured And with Haroun Rushdie has blown my mind aga

  10. says:

    Read at my girl's behest in I think 500BCE A delight of a tale Rushdie wrote the 2019 Booker shortlister uichotte which I disliked as much as I liked this book I wonder if the audience focus of the two accounts for the disparity of response?